Cows not in barn as alternative

Agrochemicals, veterinary drugs, antibiotics and improved feeds can increase
the food supply while minimising production costs in various livestock
production systems around the world. However, these days, quality-conscious
consumers are increasingly seeking environmentally safe, chemical-residue-free healthy foods, along with product traceability and a high standard of animal welfare, in which organic production methods are said to ensure. Organic production is not only a challenge for producers in developing countries, it offers
new export opportunities as well. Organic agriculture is practiced by 1.8 million producers in 160 countries, and the production of organically grown food continues to increase steadily by 15% per
year. Most tropical countries are now exporting organic agricultural products but, apart from organic beef from Brazil and Argentina, organic livestock products are yet to take off. Most trade in organic livestock products is restricted to the European Union and other developed nations. Nevertheless, tropical countries cannot afford to neglect this emerging system of animal production. Organic production is knowledge- and management-intensive. Producers must be well versed in organic production standards, principles and practices, which require a high degree of knowledge and skill. In organic production, it is not simply the final product but the whole production process that must be inspected and approved by the accredited certification bodies. Organic livestock farming is still evolving, and further research is needed to make it sustainable. In this paper, the authors review the prospects of organic animal husbandry and its possible constraints in developing and tropical countries

Vokalia and Consonantia

Cows not in barn as alternative

Organic animal husbandry, on the other hand, is defined as: a system of livestock production that promotes the use of organic and biodegradable inputs from the ecosystem in.

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